HOME

23 02 2015

Be prepared to be regaled by truly stunning photography, even when it’s ugly…..  A must watch film.  Anyone who enjoys their cushy lifestyle needs to know at what cost.  Share widely.

We are living in exceptional times. Scientists tell us that we have 10 years to change the way we live, avert the depletion of natural resources and the catastrophic evolution of the Earth’s climate.

The stakes are high for us and our children. Everyone should take part in the effort, and HOME has been conceived to take a message of mobilization out to every human being.

For this purpose, HOME needs to be free. A patron, the PPR Group, made this possible. EuropaCorp, the distributor, also pledged not to make any profit because Home is a non-profit film.

HOME has been made for you : share it! And act for the planet.

Yann Arthus-Bertrand

HOME official website
http://www.home-2009.com

PPR is proud to support HOME
http://www.ppr.com

HOME is a carbon offset movie
http://www.actioncarbone.org

More information about the Planet
http://www.goodplanet.info





Peak Footwear

18 07 2014

I was reminded to write about this subject some weeks ago when a Tassie friend of mine started listing essential things needed post crash.  On that list was footwear.  Shoes and boots, to anyone thinking like me of moving to a colder climate, are high on the list of essential things.  You can get away with walking around bare feet in Queensland for most of the year, but I suspect in Tasmania it would be out of the question, especially during the wet Winter season…….

So why write about footwear you ask…..  can’t I afford to buy sturdy boots to walk around the property?

Look around today at what people wear on their feet, and you will see shoes entirely made of plastic – read OIL.  Joggers and even loads of cheaper footwear these days are no longer made of leather.  I expect that with oil still being relatively cheap, plastic is still not as dear as leather.  Personally, I can’t wear plastic shoes, they make my feet smell for starters, and I know it’s not a personal problem, because I can wear leather shoes with woollen socks for days on end without even washing the socks with zero foot odour.  It’s definitely the plastic, and I include synthetic socks here.

So what will happen come the day oil becomes too precious for food production?  Will Nike stop making plastic shoes?

Years ago, as I was still contemplating building our house, I decided it was time I bought myself some steel capped boots; safety on a building site is always in my mind, and wearing such boots has saved my toes many times from dropping concrete blocks and heavy pieces of timber on them.  Today I wear such boots as a matter of fact, the additional steel toe never really costs much more, as I will show further down this article…..

At about that time, we were planning a trip to the snow in the old Lada Niva; so I thought now was a good time to buy some boots, I could wear them in the snow, and wear them in at the same time.  Being scroungers, we started shopping for ski gear at op shops – we did after all have to buy stuff for four of us.  One of the op shops we visited had ‘never worn’ steel capped boots going real cheap.  They looked brand new, in their original boxes…  I tried them on, and I was rapt……  great looking boots for half the price of really new ones.

However, within just two days, the soles started completely falling apart……  now I don’t normally return things at op shops, but these were supposed to be ‘brand new’, and there were more in the shop, so I took them back and the op shop gladly replaced them.  The very next day we left for our epic trip.  When you drive a couple of thousand kilometres, you don’t tend to do a lot of walking, but soon enough, the soles on these boots started falling to pieces too, just sitting there behind the wheel of my car!  I was not impressed…..  buying shoes at Thredbo is not how one gets a bargain, let me tell you!!

To cut to the chase, I eventually bought a pair of Blundstones in Brisbane, and they lasted me many many years while building, climbing up ladders, dropping aforementioned concrete blocks on them, etc etc…..

Never worn, gathering dust

Never worn, gathering dust

heel peeling off

heel peeling off

But then, another boot buying event sparked my attention on the looming footwear problem.  At a nearby hardware store, they were selling shedloads of Makita tradies’ boots.  Normally costing $160 a pair (and we are talking maybe 2005), these quadruple stitched steel capped suede boots looked like they were worth $160, and they were going for $69!  So I stupidly bought three pairs, thinking I’d now be set for life, bootwise.  I even bought Glenda a pair.  My mate Dean down the road in Cooran did the same thing I recently discovered as we were discussing these self destructing boots…..

My Blunnies were starting to seriously wear out by now (but not falling apart…) and I switched to the Makitas.  Within six months, to my horror, they too started falling apart.  So I took them back.  The store exchanged them for new ones (I discovered they had bought Makita’s entire stock as Makita was getting out of all work apparel), but within a fairly short time, they too were falling apart.  I checked the as yet never worn spare sets….. and they were cracking too.  What on Earth was going on?

Old faithfuls..

Old faithfuls..

..falling apart with still plenty of tread

..falling apart with still plenty of tread

I decided that as my last set of Blunnies had served me so well, I’d buy another pair from the local farm produce store that stocked them.  To my amazement, the boots started falling to bits.  Some energetic googling found that shoes are now pretty well exclusively soled with Polyurethane, which has a shelf life of approximately five years, regardless of wear and tear.  Talk about planned obsolescence….  So, I reluctantly returned those boots too.  What I had also learned from google is that most boots have a stamp on the sole that tells you when the boot was made, usually consisting of a ring of numbers from 1 to 12, and the year in the middle with an arrow pointing to the month of the year the item was made.  So if your boot has a stamp saying 12 with an arrow pointing to 3, your shoe was made in March 2012.  Armed with this information, I rummaged through the shop’s entire stock of Blunnies my size, found the newest ones possible and went home.  Almost on queue, they fell apart five years after the manufacturing date.  I can’t tell you now exactly how long I wore them for, but it couldn’t have been more than a couple of years.  So I bought another pair somewhere else, this time Blundstone’s top of the range waterproof steel capped boots for the princely sum of $129.  So you see, it’s not like I was skimping….  I really did go for quality.  Unfortunately, three years on, these are now too badly cracked to wear, and they are definitely no longer waterproof.  More googling determined that Blundstone warn consumers about ‘Hydrolysis’…

What is hydrolysis damage?

Hydrolysis damage occurs when moisture builds up in the thousands of air bubbles found in the soles of the footwear.  If not worn for a considerable amount of time, or stored correctly, the moisture build-up causes the soles to break down.  If stored for an extended period of time, footwear with a polyurethane sole should be kept in a cool dry spot.

And I’m not the only one who’s discovered this problem…….

It now appears one cannot buy anything not soled with that dreaded Polyurethane crap.  And why would a quality brand use material for its soles that has “thousands of air bubbles“?  So two days ago, I bought a $30 pair of Chinese made steel capped boots from Aldi.  I’m sick of wasting my money on expensive shoes that don’t last the distance.  Even if I only get 12 months wear out of them – at least I know they are brand new this time! – then they will have been better value than anything I’ve bought over the past few years.

This, however, does not solve the problem of what we might be wearing in the future when shoe shops are far away, there’s no fuel to supply them let alone drive there, and we are left to our own devices for footwear.

I find it hilarious that when confronted with collapse, most people put toilet paper at the top of their list of things that will be hard to do without……  I’m much more concerned about footwear.  Some enterprising persons who know about leatherwork are likely to become highly prized members of any community if you ask me.





Laughing all the way to the cliff……

23 05 2014

Pope Benedict is quoted as having written “The promise was that when the glass was full, it would overflow, benefiting the poor. But what happens instead, is that when the glass is full, it magically gets bigger”.  This prompted in me memories of my youth when we were promised so much technology, none of us would have to ever work, because technology would replace labour, giving us limitless leisure time.

So what happened?

Money got in the way.  Sure, robots can build cars.  Yes, gigantic combine harvesters can cut thousands of acres of wheat (and it’s only a matter of time before they do this without a driver, like the mining industry is introducing driverless Tonka Trucks).  Even ‘checkout chicks’ are being replaced with infuriating self checkout lanes……. Then we have those even more infuriating robotic answering services which Jim Kunstler recently had this to say about:

Robot phone answering systems also allowed corporations to off-load the cost of doing business onto their customers, mostly in the form of wasting vast amounts of their customers’ time. Included in the off-load was the cost of paying receptionists (as telephone answerers used to be quaintly called) and all their medical and retirement benefits — just another manifestation of the vanishing middle class, by the way, since a lot of women used to be employed that way (let’s skip the gender equality side-bar for now). After a while, the added privilege of companies being able to evade responsibility for their actions hugely outweighed the cost-saving advantage of firing some lower level employees.

Trouble is, robots don’t buy cars, harvesters don’t buy bread, and computers don’t buy groceries……  Money buys those things.  So the providers of money had no choice but to keep us all enslaved using ‘Labour Productivity’ to ensure ‘we’ could earn the money to buy the stuff made by the technology that displaced our jobs.

The result is that today’s largest sector of the economy is the financial one.  For at least twenty years, we have been encouraged – dare I say browbeaten? – to borrow ever more money to buy stuff we don’t need and which won’t last, to impress people we don’t know or care about, creating mountains of waste and oceans of plastic……

Remember those..?

Speaking of plastic, I reckon it all started with credit cards.  I remember getting my first Bankcard in the late seventies.  What an innovation that was.  How primitive they were compared to the current ‘paywave’ technology!  The card had to be put in a machine that used the raised characters on the card to make carbon copies of your details, then you had to sign the form, all in triplicate…  can you imagine the fuss such a thing would cause in a modern supermarket queue?

I can’t remember what my credit limit was back then, but it wasn’t thousands of dollars, I’m sure of that.  And you wouldn’t pull it out for any old transaction, because you were still paid in cash back then……!  Yes dear reader, cash…  The paymaster would come to your desk with a tray full of brown envelopes with real money in them and a pay statement.  One of those envelopes had your name on it, and you had to sign a form saying you’d received it, and you counted your cash (including the coins!) to make sure no one had made an error.  But when computers came along, all those people lost their jobs, nobody was needed to count your money anymore.

I know I’m showing my age now.  And feeling all nostalgic about the good old days when petrol cost fifty cents a gallon, when the Club of Rome had only just published its Limits to Growth Report, and everyone just decided to ignore it, because 2020 was so far into the future, it would be someone else’s problem.

We all thought we were laughing all the way to the bank back then……  but little did we know we were in fact laughing all the way to the cliff.

Everything, and I mean everything today is about money.  Nobody ever does anything anymore unless there’s money to be made.  They’ll even do useless things, unsustainable things, unethical things, immoral things, unbelievably stupid things….. just for the money.  Even the government’s onto it.  If there’s money to be made, they’ll throw the poor, the sick, the elderly, anybody who can’t grow the money pile, onto the shit heap we call the economy.  What are they thinking?  How can greed take over like this?  How on Earth did the Australian people get sucked in by the lies this current government were proliferating before the election?  And then elect the worst government in all of human history?  Well, alright, Hitler was worse…….  but just give these bastards a chance to catch up.

Yes, you’ve worked it out……  I despair.  See you on the edge of the cliff.

PS.  Did anyone else see this momentous piece of news about tight oil in California?  I haven’t laughed so hard in a very long time…..

In 2011, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy commissioned INTEK Inc., a Virginia-based consulting firm, to estimate how much oil might be recoverable from California’s vast Monterey Shale formation. Production of tight oil was soaring in North Dakota and Texas, and small, risk-friendly drilling companies were making salivating noises (within earshot of potential investors) about the potential for an even bigger bonanza in the Golden State.

INTEK obliged with a somewhat opaque report (apparently based on oil company investor presentations) suggesting that the Monterey might yield 15.4 billion barrels—64 percent of the total estimated tight oil reserves of the lower 48 states. The EIA published this number as its own, and the University of Southern California then went on to use the 15.4 billion barrel figure as the basis for an economic study, claiming that California could look forward to 2.8 million additional jobs by 2020 and $24.6 billion per year in additional tax revenues if the Monterey reserves were “developed” (i.e., liquidated as quickly as possible).
 
We at Post Carbon Institute took a skeptical view of both the EIA/INTEK and USC reports. In 2013, PCI Fellow David Hughes produced an in-depth study (and a report co-published by PCI and Physicians Scientists & Engineers for Healthy Energy) that examined the geology of the Monterey Shale and the status of current oil production projects there. Hughes found that the Monterey differs in several key respects from tight oil deposits in North Dakota and Texas, and that currently producing hydrofractured wells in the formation show much lower productivity than assumed in the EIA/INTEK report. Hughes concluded that “Californians would be well advised to avoid thinking of the Monterey Shale as a panacea for the State’s economic and energy concerns.”
 
On May 21 the Los Angeles Times reported that “Federal energy authorities have slashed by 96% the estimated amount of recoverable oil buried in California’s vast Monterey Shale deposits, deflating its potential as a national ‘black gold mine’ of petroleum.” The EIA had already downgraded its technically recoverable reserves estimate for the Monterey from 15.4 to 13.7 billion barrels; now it was reducing the number to a paltry 0.6 billion barrels.




How to rethink environmental folklore

16 02 2014

It’s very very rare these days that I read or watch something off the internet that actually makes me fee uplifted…. well, this is one such video.  This Australian woman, Leyla Acaroglu, is one smart cookie.  Everything she says are things I have said myself for years and years….  her opinion of fridges in particular really really resonates with me.  And kettles……  boy do electric kettles, or rather the way they are being used, really gets up my nose…  ditto with mobile phones.

“Consumption is the biggest problem….. Design is one of the best solution”





Want proof the world’s gone mad…….?

2 06 2013

I just found this on the net, and I just had to share it with you all…..  Exactly how can anyone think or believe this is sustainable..?  At first glance, these pictures look like they depict a network of fields stretching to the horizon.  But in fact, the extraordinary images show an area of Spain as large as the Isle of Wight, or roughly 380 km², totally covered in greenhouses…….  The fruit and vegetables grown in the futuristic-looking structures end up on tables in Britain and elsewhere.

Breathtaking: These greenhouses in southern Spain cover an area of 100,000 acres, which is as large as the Isle of Wight

The greenhouses have had such an impact on the area of Almeria in the south of the country that they have lowered the average temperature by reflecting away light.

Swamped: Some towns have been almost entirely overtaken by the ever-growing sea of greenhouses

Fifty years ago, the land was so barren that it was used to film ‘spaghetti westerns’ wanting to replicate the look of American deserts.  But with imported soil and hydroponic systems that drip-feed chemical fertilisers into grow-bags, the area now has the largest collection of greenhouses in the world.  Many Spanish workers find it too hot to work there, so most of the staff are immigrants from Africa and Eastern Europe – either legal or illegal.

Barren: The landscape was once used to film spaghetti westerns because it was so desert-like

Plastic manufacturers and recycling companies have also set up in the region, where discarded plastic sheeting and rubbish is blown around by the wind.

Last month the death of a sperm whale that washed up on Spain’s south coast was linked to the Almeria greenhouses after it was found to have swallowed 37lb (17kg) of plastic waste dumped into the sea.

In the first quarter of 2012 food exports from Almeria, including lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes, watermelons and peppers, were valued at €1.4billion.

If EVER there was proof you can do anything with fossil fuels, this MUST be it……. and now this: