Playing with gloop

14 05 2017

I’m often asked – and I often ask myself – why do I own three utes?  Well dear reader, I just worked it out! At very short notice, I got a text message from Matt next door that Steve could start cutting the trenches that have to be the foundations for our house’s slab on Friday afternoon, and Saturday norning if necessary to finish the job. Typically for Tasmania, the weather forecast went from fine weather to calamitous……. thunderstorms and minor flooding for the North of the island was predicted, and this fortunately did not eventuate, but as luck would have it, we in the South ended up copping some.

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Ready for action

Because the trenches are too far from the embankment where I want the earth moved to, it would all need to be moved with a vehicle, so I hunted around for a small tip truck, and found one, but as usual, the locals let me down again. I sometimes wonder how they stay in business…..

 

So I set up all three utes like a train, and lined Caleb to come back, hopefully with a mate, to do all the hard yakka. The mate could not make it on the day, so the pair of us worked our arses off, shoveling and 20170512_135641shoving and shuttling utes around trying to keep up with the digger. Which we largely managed to achieve…… but as luck would have it, as soon as the first ute (the 4WD one) was loaded and ready for moving, it refused to start. Luckily it has a very strong battery, and I actually managed to reverse it, with a ton of mud on the back, with the starter motor, to get it out of the way and reverse another ute in its place…. not a great start.

20170513_083021Amazingly – and very fortunately it eventually turned out – the 4WD started first kick a couple of hours later, just as the rain started….. I say fortunately, because 2WD utes don’t do gloop…!

Eventually, having finished the main trench down the front wall, we called it a day. Overnight, we got just over 6mm of rain, and in the morning, the site was really starting to look like quagmire, and the clay was getting heavier and stickier, making it largely impossible to shovel by hand. With only one ute able to get up the hill with a load (yes, it started again!), slip sliding all the way to the unloading site, it was decided that it would be more efficient, and certainly easier on us with the shovels, for Steve to move the excavator up the hill and scrape all the clay with the mud bucket off the tray….  Aah, the power of fossil fuels!20170513_091727

It was eventually all done, though where the lateral trenches came out through the edge of the main one, so sticky was the clay that a lot of earth came off the corners. The odd rock didn’t help either, and everywhere excess dirt is removed, more concrete will have to replace it, costing both me and the environment. Some things just can’t be helped, one has to deal with the situation at hand….20170513_100748

Caleb and I even had to stand in the trench to lift, mostly by hand, large clumps of sticky clay into Steve’s bucket so it could be lifted on the back of the ute and moved uphill. Let me tell you, I really look forward to the day this stage is over!

To put into perspective how bloody sticky the gloop was, I’ll leave you with a shot of the 4WD’s foot well that I will have fun cleaning up one day…. I even found the rubber pad off the brake pedal in the grass later, where it had obviously been so stuck to my boot, I pulled it off the metal pedal to get out the car! Pure luck it came off my boot right where I stepped off……20170513_110907

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Blindspots and Superheroes

14 05 2017

I haven’t heard much from Nate Hagens in recent times, but when he does come out of the woodwork, his communications skills certainly come through….. We who follow the collapse of the world as we know it probably know most of what’s in this admirable presentation, but it is absolutely captivating, and you will learn something new, or see it in a different perspective. It’s an hour and twenty minutes long (I actually drove down town to use the library’s free wi-fi to download it, my mobile phone data allowance won’t stretch to a quarter Gig for one video!), so make yourself a cup of your favourite poison, and enjoy the show……

Nathan John Hagens is a former Wall Street analyst, turned college professor and systems-science advocate. Nate has an MBA with Honors from the University of Chicago and a PhD in Natural Resources/Energy from the University of Vermont. He is on the Boards of Post Carbon Institute, Institute for Integrated Economic Research, and Institute for the Study of Energy and our Future. He teaches a class at the University of Minnesota called “Reality 101 – A Survey of the Human Predicament”.

Nate, partnering with environmental strategist DJ White, has created the “Bottleneck Foundation”, a nonprofit initiative designed to help steer towards better human and ecological futures than would otherwise be attained. The “Bottlenecks” are the cultural, biological, and technological challenges which will arise as energy and terrestrial biomass begin their long fall back toward sustainable-flow baselines this century. The “Foundation” part of the name is a tip of the hat to Asimov’s “Foundation” series of novels, about an organization designed to mitigate the negative effects of societal simplification. BF is dedicated to making “synthesis science” accessible to a new generation of engaged people, through educational materials and projects which demonstrate that reality is a lot different from our culture currently thinks it is.