Dan Britt – Orbits and Ice Ages: The History of Climate

23 07 2015

This video was posted on Peak Prosperity.  It’s over three years old now, but it’s an excellent talk that may clarify a lot of questions for DTM readers.  Enjoy…..


Actions

Information

11 responses

23 07 2015
davekimble3
23 07 2015
mikestasse

Sorry, there was a missing letter at the end of the URL, it’s fixed now…….

23 07 2015
Anthony William O'brien

The idea that humans are responsible for most of the warming is a furphy. Humans are responsible for all of the warming plus some. (Notice how William Ruddiman’s work is becoming mainstream)

21 05 2016
irvn ryn (@txtist)

but who would tax us, condemn our lifestyle all the while being creepy hypocrites?
And let’s not start with the guilt tripping by the alarmists ..

23 07 2015
Anthony William O'brien

One question. I though there was about 80 meters of sea level rise if all the ice melted and then add 20 to 30 meters of sea level rise from isostatic rebound and the gravity effect of the glaciers. Dan Britt talks of sea levels being more than 200 meters higher during the cretaceous, backed up by well accepted science. Is all that difference due to the Himalayan uplift?

24 07 2015
mikestasse

The figure I’ve seen is 65m if ALL the landed ice melted….

And yes to your 2nd question.

24 07 2015
Anthony William O'brien

Been looking around and the figures do vary. Hard to know who includes what, but we do have the direct effect of the melted ice, rebound, gravity of the ice sheets and circulation changes. And that is the static ocean, not accounting for storm surges, increased wave height and wave ramping.

Academic really, not even the most pessimistic see anything like that in our life time, or the lifetime of our children. However there are many much more pessimistic than the IPCC

21 05 2016
irvn ryn (@txtist)

..funny how 45 million centuries of climate, climate history, and warming & cooling have not yet ended life on the planet ..
And who set tax rates and carbon trading all those millions of years?

22 05 2016
mikestasse

It came close a few times, and each time, it took MILLIONS of years for diversity to claw back……

Generally, biodiversity recovers 5 to 10 million years after the extinction event. In the most severe mass extinctions it may take 15 to 30 million years. The worst event, the Permian–Triassic extinction event, devastated life on earth and is estimated to have killed off over 90% of species. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extinction_event

This is also the very first time ONE species existing on earth, us, is responsible for such an extinction event. In the past, such events were entirely beyond the control of any species living at the time, so silly comments about Carbon taxes are just that, silly…

20 12 2018
Ken Hudson

The main lessons to be learned here: global temperature, however you care to measure it, has usually been a lot higher than it is today. Back when dinosaurs flourished the CO2 content of the atmosphere was several times what it is today. There were no polar or Greenland icecaps. Sea level was much higher. And life was spectacularly abundant and diverse. So anyone claiming that “we are killing the planet” is stark raving insane. We may well be killing our own species off and we may well take a lot of other species with us. Doesn’t matter. Mass extinctions have happened before. And they’ll happen again. Life will survive this episode and rebound to become abundant and diverse again. “But we humans won’t survive!” you howl. OK. Here’s my question: So what? Why should any rational being care if a horribly invasive species that wantonly destroys thousands of other species, should itself go extinct? Why should that be considered a net loss for the earth’s biosphere? When anyone with even half a brain can see that it would be an overwhelming net gain? I’ve asked this question many many times and have never received an answer that made any kind of sense, Your thoughtful comments are welcome. Your emotional rants will be ignored.

21 12 2018
mikestasse

Look, you are right, we’re not ‘destroying the planet’, we are screwing human civilisation….. You have to admit we’re capable of some pretty amazing things, among the amazingly stupid ones, and while it might be good for the planet if we all disappeared, it is a shame we can’t manage to be a whole lot cleverer about the way we do things.

On a personal basis, I am deeply disappointed with humanity….

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s