A Fearful Glance at the Global Carbon Stores — Weekly CO2 Values Hit 404 Parts Per Million a Little Too Soon

17 04 2015

robertscribbler

mlo two years April 15

(Big jump in weekly CO2 averages during second week of April bring 2015 concentrations into the range of 404 parts per million a month earlier than expected. Image source: The Keeling Curve.)

Over the past decade, annual rates of atmospheric CO2 increase have remained in a range of around 2.2 parts per million (ppm) each year. It’s a geologically blinding pace of increase driven by a human carbon emission on the order of around 11 billion tons each and every year. Primarily driven by fossil fuel burning, this massive dumping of carbon into the atmosphere is steadily filling up a number of the world’s key carbon stores.

The oceans are brimming full with carbon — as we see in a rapidly rising rate of acidification.  The oceans are warming, steadily losing their ability to keep a higher fraction of greenhouse gasses stored in solution. The trees are lagging in…

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3 responses

17 04 2015
davekimble3

> The oceans are brimming full with carbon

Absolutely untrue. They are at about 25% of capacity.

> Of course, these admittedly worrisome spikes could well be noise in the overall carbon system.

Absolutely true. And the smaller the timeframe of measurements, the more readings are going to be due to weather rather than climate change. Since the whole article is based on weekly averages, these “admittedly worrisome” spikes are clearly weather-related. So who says they are “admittedly worrisome”? Only himself – self-fulfilling prophecy.

We know that the various ocean currents are many and complex, and operate on different timescales, some of which are measured in centuries. So the localised releasing of CO2 from the oceans is going to be unpredictable by definition, and only using measurements from Mauna Loa is going to bias things tremendously.

17 04 2015
mikestasse

The oceans may theoretically be ‘at only 25% capacity’, but the acidity levels are already causing havoc……. and even thinking of going to 100% is, well, unthinkable.

18 04 2015
Anthony William O'brien

http://www.biogeosciences.net/11/3453/2014/bg-11-3453-2014.pdf
Such a tizzy because the natural world isn’t keeping up with our increases in CO2 emissions. But we always knew this was going to happen.

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